State Flower Of New Hampshire

State Flower Of New Hampshire

Purple Lilac Is The Official State Flower Of New Hampshire.  New Hampshire Adopted the purple lilac as the official state flower in 1919. The purple aster, apple blossom, Mayflower, wild pasture rose, evening primrose and buttercup were all considered, but the purple lilac was chosen as the New Hampshire State Flower because this flower presents the hardy character of the men and women of the Granite State. National Flower Of New Hampshire Purple Lilac is a deciduous shrub used as a hedge or as an individual accent plant. As its name suggests, State Flower Purple Lilac has light purple flowers occurring in clusters amid the dark-green heart-shaped leaves. Purple Lilacs flowers are gorgeous, which can withstand severely cold winters even -35 degrees C with captivating fragrance. The Common Purple Lilac shrub produces suckers – new shoots that sprout from the base of the shrub, or from the roots. There are about 20 species of Lilacs or Syringa(genus) in flowering plants. State Flower Of New Hampshire Purple Lilacs belongs to family Oleaceae (olive). Purple Lilacs are native to Europe and Asia and were imported to America in 1750. The National Flower Of New Hampshire Purple Lilac flowers are produced in spring.  Each Purple Lilac flower is about 1 cm in diameter and has a tube-shaped base with four spreading petal lobes. New Hampshire State Flower Lilac flowers are larger and more diverse in color and form. The Lilac flowers grow in large panicles. Almost all the species have a strong aroma. 

 

Identifying The Purple Lilac

 

  • The leaves of the purple lilac are opposite, broadly ovate, and simple. They grow to between 2 and 4 inches long and 1 1/2 to 3 inches wide. The leaves’ color varies from bluish-green to dark green.
  • The flowers grow in terminal clusters with a height of between 4 and 7 inches. They can either be pink, white, or light purple. The flowers are incredibly fragrant.
  • The fruits are 1/2 inch long, dry, and Brown capsules.
  • The twigs are stout, ridged or angled, glabrous, lustrous brown, crescent-shaped, leaf scars raised, and with numerous raised lenticels. They have large green buds that turn purple during the winter.
  • The bark is smooth but turns shreddy when the plant gets older.
  • Location: Prefers sun, cool weather, and moderate moisture
  • Range: Northeastern to central U.S. and Canada, plus South Dakota, Kansas, Colorado.
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